Spotlight: Edward VI


Names: Edward Tudor / Edward VI

Titles: Duke of Cornwall / Prince of Wales / King of England, Ireland and France / Supreme Head of the Church of England

Dates: 12 October 1537 – 6 July 1553

Spouse: None

Children: None

Parents: Henry VIII 1491-1547 & Jane Seymour 1507-1537

Siblings: Mary I 1518-1558 & Elizabeth I 1533-1603 (half-siblings)

Noble Connections: Edward’s grandfather, John Seymour, had been knighted by Henry VIII, and his uncles Edward and Thomas became Duke of Somerset and Baron Seymour respectively. One of Edward’s aunts, Elizabeth, became Baroness Cromwell.

Continue reading “Spotlight: Edward VI”

Important Tudor Executions on Tower Hill


Memorial on Tower Hill to those executed there.
Memorial on Tower Hill to those executed there.

Very few executions actually took place within the walls of the Tower of London. Most executions took place on the nearby Tower Hill. This post will cover the latter executions. A different post covers the former executions in the Tower itself. The executions on Tower Hill were more of a spectator sport, whereas the Tower dealt with potentially dangerous or controversial executions like Queens of England and prominent nobles.

Edward Stafford 3rd Duke of Buckingham c.1520
Edward Stafford 3rd Duke of Buckingham c.1520

Edward Stafford, Duke of Buckingham 1521 – Edward Stafford was executed on 17th May 1521. Henry VIII knew that Stafford probably had a stronger legitimate claim to the throne than he did as the Tudor descended from the illegitimate Beaufort line. In 1520 Henry authorised an investigation against him and he was tried before a group of seventeen of his peers, as was customary for the nobility. It is suggested his opposition to the King stemmed from his hatred of Wolsey. Continue reading “Important Tudor Executions on Tower Hill”

Tudor Executions within the Tower of London


Very few executions actually took place within the walls of the Tower of London. Most executions took place on the nearby Tower Hill, like those of Thomas Cromwell, Edward Stafford Duke of Buckingham, and Thomas More. These will be discussed in another post. Below are the notable executions that took place within the Tower during the reign of the Tudors. Lord Hastings was the first real execution in the Tower in 1483, although it is also suspected that the Princes in the Tower (Edward V and Richard Duke of York) were also secretly killed here around the same time.

Anne Boleyn National Portrait Gallery.
Anne Boleyn National Portrait Gallery.

Anne Boleyn 1536

Anne Boleyn was executed on 19th May 1536 on charges of adultery, incest and treason. I fully believe she was innocent and was actually executed because she failed to give Henry VIII a son and he had fallen in love with Jane Seymour who did eventually give him a son. Her so-called ‘accomplices’ had died two days earlier, including her brother and a court musician, Mark Smeaton. The other accused were William Brereton, Francis Weston and Henry Norris. All perished. Continue reading “Tudor Executions within the Tower of London”

Spotlight: Elizabeth of York


Name: Elizabeth of York / Elizabeth Plantagenet

Title/s: Queen of England, Ireland and France, Princess of England.

Birth / Death: 11 February 1466 – 11 February 1503.

Spouse: Henry VII 1457 – 1509.

Children: Arthur Prince of Wales 1486 – 1502, Margaret Queen of Scotland 1489 – 1541, Henry VIII of England 1491 – 1547, Elizabeth Tudor 1492 – 1495, Mary Duchess of Suffolk 1496 – 1533, Edmund Duke of Somerset 1499 – 1500, Katherine Tudor 1503.

Parents: Edward IV 1442 – 1483 and Elizabeth Woodville 1437 – 1492.

Continue reading “Spotlight: Elizabeth of York”

Spotlight: Henry VIII


Name: Henry Tudor / King Henry VIII of England.

Title/s: Prince of Wales / King of England, Ireland and France / Defender of the Faith / Supreme Head of the Church of England.

Birth / Death: 28 June 1491 – 28 January 1547.

Spouse: Katherine of Aragon 1485-1536 / Anne Boleyn 1501-1536 / Jane Seymour 1507-1537 / Anne of Cleves 1515-1557 / Katherine Howard 1521-1542 / Katherine Parr 1512-1548.

Children: Henry Duke of Cornwall 1511 / Mary I of England 1516 – 1558 (by Katherine of Aragon) / Henry Fitzroy 1519 – 1536 (illegitimate, by Elizabeth Blount) / Elizabeth I of England 1533 – 1603 (by Anne Boleyn) / Edward VI of England 1537 – 1553 (by Jane Seymour).

Parents: Henry VII of England 1457 – 1509 & Elizabeth of York 1466 – 1503.

Siblings: Arthur 1486-1502 / Margaret 1489-1541 / Elizabeth 1492-1495 / Mary 1495-1533 / Edmund 1499-1500 / Edward (unknown) / Katherine 1503

Continue reading “Spotlight: Henry VIII”

Photos from The Tudors Seasons 1-4


 

Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn in 'The Tudors' (2008).
Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn in ‘The Tudors’ (2008).

Photos from The Tudors Seasons 1-4

There is a large selection of photos on my Facebook page today from The Tudors Seasons 1-4.

It stars Jonathan Rhys Meyers as Henry VIII, Henry Cavill as Charles Brandon, Maria Doyle Kennedy as Katherine of Aragon, Natalie Dormer as Anne Boleyn, Annabelle Wallis as Jane Seymour, Joss Stone as Anne of Cleves, Tamzin Merchant as Katherine Howard and Joely Richardson as Katherine Parr along with James Frain as Thomas Cromwell and Sam Neill as Thomas Wolsey.

Interesting Set of Posts By Claire Ridgway


Claire Ridgway, writer and author, runs The Anne Boleyn Files.
Claire Ridgway, writer and author, runs The Anne Boleyn Files.

Interesting Set of Posts By Claire Ridgway

This morning I came across this interesting set of posts written by Claire Ridgway of The Anne Boleyn Files on the stereotypes of the six wives of Henry VIII.

Opinions? Comments?

 

The Tudor Rose


The Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York, alter combined to create the iconic Tudor Rose.
The Red Rose of Lancaster and the White Rose of York, alter combined to create the iconic Tudor Rose.

The Tudor rose is, of course, the most poignant symbol of the Tudor dynasty and what it stood for. The visuals are very well-known – the red rose and the white rose together. But what does it actually stand for and what is the significance of it?

Jean Plaidy in her novel, The Red Rose of Anjou imagines a scene where the roses come into play. It goes as follows:

“[Somerset] moved away from Buckingham’s restraining hand and plucking one of the red roses, the symbol of the House of Lancaster since the days of Edmund, Earl of Lancaster and brother of Edward the First, he cried out: ‘I pluck this red rose. The red rose of Lancaster. I am for Lancaster and the King.’

Warwick turned away and immediately picked a white rose – the symbol of York – the white rose worn by the Black Prince himself. He held the rose on high. ‘I pluck this white rose,’ he said. ‘The white rose of York. Let every man among us choose his rose. Continue reading “The Tudor Rose”

Ten Famous Mothers and Daughters

Ten Famous Mothers and Daughters

Three guesses who is at number one!

Anne Boleyn and Elizabeth I.


Ten Famous Mothers and Daughters

Three guesses who is at number one!

Anne Boleyn Hever Castle Portrait
Anne Boleyn Hever Castle Portrait

 

Elizabeth I Darnley Portrait 1575
Elizabeth I Darnley Portrait 1575

Anne Boleyn and Elizabeth I.

Hi Everyone!


Why did I start this blog and what do I want to achieve?

I started this blog because I wanted to share my love of the Tudors with as many people as possible. History is often seen as a boring subject, but I want to engage people with history, and hopefully make others more interested in it. History courses at colleges and universities often don’t have enough pupils on them, considering that history can make you think differently about the present, and hopefully change the future. If I can make just one more person interested in the Tudors, or in history in general then I’ll have achieved something.

What is my particular interest?

I’m particularly interested in the wives of Henry VIII. Anne Boleyn is my speciality, but I’m also really interested in the lives of Anne of Cleves and Katherine Howard, though there is a shortage of sources on them. However, I’m also interested in the fiction side of things – TV shows like ‘The Tudors’ and books like ‘The Other Boleyn Girl’ by Philippa Gregory and ‘The Tudor Wife’ by Emily Purdy and ‘Murder Most Royal’ by Jean Plaidy. I will blog about these, as well as facts, and how these fiction versions compare to the historical record.

Qualifications and interest?

I have a BA (Hons) degree in History, with my dissertation entitled ‘What do Contemporary Sources Reveal about Anne Boleyn’s Public Image?’ from 2012. I also have an MA in History from 2013, with a thesis entitled ‘The Many Faces of Anne Boleyn: Perceptions in History, Literature and Film’. I am currently applying for PhDs with a working title for my thesis of ‘Female Consorts: an Analysis of Film and Literature in History from Elizabeth Woodville to Katherine Parr 1464-1547’.

If you have any questions, please ask.